More Regarding the New (old) Government Model

Follow up as of 13 June A. D. 2015.

Series 70 with checkered plain grips and field expedient grip safety adaptor.

Series 70 with checkered plain grips and field expedient grip safety adaptor.


After disassembly, inspection and so forth, I discovered the ejector was a Super .38/9mm ejector. Which is longer then the standard .45 ACP ejector for this arm. Needless to say, I procured a standard .45 ACP ejector, then test fired the pistol again. I used a different magazine, by the way. The pistol worked better than before, but did malfunction at least every other shot. Arg…

Back home and another inspection. This time I noted the aftermarket recoil buffer, a shock absorbing ring sort of arrangement installed on the recoil spring guide was frayed and disintegrating. So I removed it. (They are not part of the original design and are not popular in some circles.) The arm now works.

Series 70 sight alignment after sights painted matte black.

Series 70 sight alignment after sights painted matte black.

If I didn’t mention it, the sights as purchased were two white dots on the rear sight, either side of the notch. The front sight had a vertical channel cut and filled with white. As popular as such fillers might be in the community, I find them abhorrent and painted them all with matte black model paint.

Series 70 with sights painted matte black

Series 70 with sights painted matte black


I am happy to report my Hardball (with lead bullet) reloads chronograph at an average of just less than 861 feet per second. The U. S. Army Field Manual with specifications for small arms ammunition shows .45 (ACP) caliber standard load ammunition shows the required velocity is 875 feet per second, plus or minus 25 feet per second.

However, now I can fire an actual string at twenty-five yards, I find the pistol groups to the right a bit high. So at the very least, I shall have to move the rear sight to the left about one whack. Since the rear sight is fixed, but ‘drifts’ laterally in a slot cut in the slide, one usually uses a brass drift and hammer of small to moderate size to move the rear sight. Or one can purchase a ‘sight adjustment tool’, consisting of a holder straddling the slide and a tightly threaded screw arrangement to push the rear (or front if of the dovetail variety) laterally. Being the frugal sort I am, the brass drift and hammer work quite well.

Series 70 using Hardball (lead) ammunition at twenty-five yards, two handed rapid fire.

Series 70 using Hardball (lead) ammunition at twenty-five yards, two handed rapid fire.


Series 70 using Hardball (lead) ammunition showing detail of twenty-five yard group. Series 70 using Hardball (lead) ammunition showing detail of twenty-five yard group.[/caption]

I also took the liberty of removing the badly checkered and somewhat cheap Colt grips that had been on the arm. The right side escutcheon kept falling out. It is plastic and flash plated with something alleged to resemble gold. (It isn’t solid metal of any sort, let alone gold.) The grips now in place resemble the style of the U. S. brown plastic grips which graced the pistol in the service from 1924 or so on. Except they are proper wood and checkered by someone or a machine conversant with the process.

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